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20121201
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it is obvious that mohammed morsi fully intends to create hard line islamist regime there as explained in the last 80 years of the group's history. somehow "the new york times" manages to find that moderate, unquote. jon: you're right, jim it is kirkpatrick, that's why you're so good keeping an eye on the media, including me. let's see what president obama had to say when hosni mubarak was in power listen to this. >> it is not the role of any other country to determine egypt's leaders, only the egyptian people can do that. what is clear, and what i indicated tonight to president hosni mubarak is my belief that an orderly transition must be meaningful, it must be peaceful, and it must begin now. jon: so, the president got his wish. hosni mubarak ended up leaving office and look at what we have. who is this guy, this muslim brotherhood member, alan? >> it wasn't up to president obama to change government in egypt. it didn't happen because of president obama it happened because of an arab spring and it happened organically because the people in egypt, which is the way it should happen, we
with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag. the people were -- the liberals, the so-called liberals i think were upset, but there was no sign that they were going to actually unify and this really pushed it over the edge. heather: so they have banded together. what about the role of the military, in terms of morsi? the military backed the previous president hosni mubarak. on thursday they intervened for the first time in these latest clashes. what is their role with morsi
earths and opponents much egyptian president mohammed morsi staging massive rallies one day before voting on a draft constitution that has plunged the count are country into a political hotbed. here is the scene. >> reporter: we are on the eave of that crucial vote. this is what it's all b. this is a copy of the draft constitution. it is 63-pages long, 256 articles and it is causing a lot of problems, including in the egyptian city today of alexandria. protestors for and against president mohammed morsi and the constitution clashing in the streets after a cleric urged a yes vote at friday prayers, he's not supposed to do that. rocks were torn, cars were torched, there were injuries and arrests. so far in cairo it has been quiet. the muslim brotherhood, promorsi forces gathering in one location in fairly big numbers. also behind us here in tahrir square and in the presidential palace the critics of the constitution and president mohammed morsi also gathering. so far the two sides have stayed apart. alisyn: is there anyway to proceed ticket what will happe predict what will happen this week
's referendum vote on a divisive new constitution. it was drafted largely by allies of mohamed morsi. an egyptian spoke men said that they will aim at ending the political crisis. >>> and a global call for countries to lift their hiv travel restrictions. 45 nations seen on this map have laws that deport, detain, or deny entry to people who are hiv positive. now companies like coca-cola and gap and from the nba say those travel bans are discriminatory and bad for business. until recently, the u.s., too, had regular layings that barred foreign nationals from receiving a visa from entering the country. president obama lifted that ban in 2010. >>> and a chain of check stores is selling what they believe is the, yes, very last shipment of twinkies in the country. jewel said that hostess offered the entire shipment left in the georgia plant, including 20,000 boxes of twinkies and 5,000 boxes of ding dongs, zingers and you can buy them while supplies last but not for much longer. if you're thinking of the gift to give someone, just don't know what to get them, give them a twinkie. >> when w
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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